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Battered Cod and my Eclipse Pictures of my Colander

If you miss battered cod on a low-carb, grain-free diet, here's a recipe that'll satisfy your craving. It's based on a Dr. Davis recipe.

Battered cod and cole slaw

Ingredients

1 pound cod fillets
2 eggs
2 tablespoons butter, melted
1/2 cup ground golden flaxseeds
1/2 cup grated cheddar cheese
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon garlic powder

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 375°F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Slice the cod into 1-1/2 to 2 inch pieces.

In a small bowl, whisk the eggs and butter. Beat continuously--don't let the butter cook the eggs.

In a shallow bowl, combine the flaxseeds, cheese, onion powder, garlic powder, salt, and pepper.

Coat each piece of cod in the egg mixture and then roll in the in the flaxseed mixture. Place on the baking pan.

Bake for 20 minutes, turning once.

Eclipse Crescent Shadows

Today was the total solar eclipse, and my house was in the "path of totality." My employer let me work from home because I have a long commute and the roads were going to be crowded with tourists. It was warm and sunny, but forty minutes before the eclipse, it started feeling cooler. It gradually got oddly darker--not like darkness from clouds or a warm-colored sunset, but gray. A few minutes before the eclipse, neighbors' porch lights started shining, and then it was dark as night. Street lights came on. There were no shadows from the sun, only yellow sunlight on the horizon. Neighbors cheered and set off fireworks. I was so cold I stood against the house to get warm. A few minutes later when the light started coming back, I took some pictures of crescent shadows cast by my colander showing the pinhole effect. The effect lasted quite a while, long enough to show the shadows to the mailman and some passers-by.

Pinhole effect from the solar eclipse.


Comments

Thanks for the recipe suggestion, and sharing your experience for the total solar eclipse.
Eddie and I were not able to see it where we live in the UK but enjoyed the many TV and news items about it.

All the best Jan

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